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" read a Fortune headline, trivializing Bradford as if she were a blonde 20-something who gave more brain space to boys than to her degree from one of the best business schools in the country—her innovations speak for themselves.

Bradford is smart, and The League is a strong product.

compares itself to the dating site Tinder, popular with younger people as a place where one is more likely to find a casual date than true love.

Researchers found that 6 percent of those 55 to 64, and 3 percent of those 65 and older, used online dating sites.

that it was tough knowing what Dominic would be up to at work: "That was hard, knowing he's going to make out with Keira Knightley."She added that it was difficult knowing that he ended up going out with a woman he'd been linked to while he was seeing her: "Or the girl he's now dating [Ruth Negga].

I was in Ireland and the article came out and he was caught with his co-star.

Aptly named to imply a superior caste of digital daters, The League relies on a screening algorithm that promises to keep its community "well-balanced and high-quality," so perhaps the negative press was somewhat understandable.

Unsurprisingly, there are a lot of people who want to date without ditching their discretionary concerns.

Plus, for those who want added privacy, Bradford developed a premium service, the League's "Heavy Hitters," which ensures ultimate control.

But beneath The League's veneer of exclusivity, there's a clever, problem-solving interface that seals it: The app's strength is its function, not its flash. Here, why you should have it on your radar: #1: The privacy thing.

It's easy, too easy, to count the reasons why any woman who wants to "date intelligently," as their tagline goes, would love the app, which—while it rolls out today in San Francisco only—will spring up in major U. Bradford, a former Google employee who holds an MBA from Stanford, snagged on something when she suddenly became single in grad school: She wanted to join Tinder and Ok Cupid, but she didn't want everyone (her professors, her potential future employers, her ex boyfriend's friends) seeing her personal information and that she was "on the prowl." But how could she put herself out there without overexposing herself in the process?

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